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30 Sep

JUDITH JÁUREGUI & OCM

Auditorio Nacional de Madrid
Monday, 30/09/2019 19:30

JUDITH JÁUREGUI & OCM

THE SCHUMANN CONCERTO AND THE TCHAIKOVSKY'S PATHÉTIQUE

Auditorio Nacional de Madrid

Monday, 30/09/2019 19:30

Before music was considered a form of therapy, Tchaikovsky and Schumann knew it to be an essential remedy for alleviating the terrible effects of depression and bipolar disorder, which affected their lives so completely.

The emergence of Schumann’s piano concerto took place after he recovered from one of those nervous breakdowns, which, since the age of 24, were becoming more persistent. In 1846 he returned to the idea of writing a concerto for piano based on an earlier work, Fantasy for Piano in A minor, to which he added two movements and created one of the pinnacles of piano repertoire.

Modest Tchaikovsky heard what would be his brother’s last composition and told him the symphony was Patetícheskaya, which means ‘passionate’ or ’emotive’, something that has great emotional content. That is what Tchaikovsky achieved in each of the four movements of the work: to alter our mood and take us from sadness to joy, passing through loneliness, melancholy and hope. In addition, this piece is spoken of as an Ethos symphony as it explains in detail the personality and character of the composer. Because of that and because he died nine days after the premiere of the work, it is considered a ‘living testament’ and even a Requiem.

 

 

REPERTOIRE

R. Schumann: Piano Concerto, op. 54
P.I. Tchaikovsky: Symphony No 6, op. 74 ‘Pathétique’

PLAYERS

Orquestra Simfònica Camera Musicae
Judith Jáuregui, piano
Tomàs Grau, conductor
27 Oct

TITAN SYMPHONY BY MAHLER

Palau de la Música Catalana
Sunday, 27/10/2019 17:30

TITAN SYMPHONY BY MAHLER

LIVIU PRUNARU & OCM

Palau de la Música Catalana

Sunday, 27/10/2019 17:30

SIMMERING

Mendelssohn had promised his friend, the violinist Ferdinand David, that he would write a concerto for him. It took him six years to keep his word (in 1844) but it was worth it. The considered “most classic of all the romantics” included some novelties in this concerto that later composers were influenced by: it is the violin, and not the orchestra, which introduces the first theme of the first movement and the cadence is not at the end. The soloist also acts as an accompanist of the orchestra on many occasions.

Mahler also took time to write his first symphony (1884 to 1888). It is inspired by the work of Jean Paul, entitled Titan. It is not a symphonic poem but a reflection of the emotions, humour and drama that he lived with his reading. The sound of a cuckoo that introduces the clarinet in the first movement as well as the waltz rhythm of the second portray his love for nature and the memories of childhood and youth. The funeral march of the third with a reworking of the song Frere Jacques musically draws the picture of Callot, in which some animals attend the burial of a hunter. The energetic fourth movement serves as a triumphant finale.


REPERTOIRE

F. MENDELSSOHN: Violin Concerto, op. 64
G. MAHLER: Symphony No. 1, “Titan”

PLAYERS

Liviu Prunaru, violin
Orquestra Simfònica Camera Musicae
Tomàs Grau, conductor

24 Nov

GAUTIER CAPUÇON & OCM

Palau de la Música Catalana
Sunday, 24/11/2019 17:30

GAUTIER CAPUÇON & OCM

THE HOLST PLANETS AND THE ROCOCO VARIATIONS

Palau de la Música Catalana

Sunday, 24/11/2019 17:30

PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

The Rococo was an artistic movement characterized, in painting, by the softness of the colours and the gentleness of the subjects. In music, Mozart was one of the main representatives of the movement at the beginning of his career with works that advocated light and catchy melodies, very clear structures and little use of counterpoint. With Variations, written in 1876, Tchaikovsky paid tribute to the Mozart style that he admired so much. By proposing a theme and seven variations, the violoncellist has to demonstrate equally his technical and expressive virtuosity as well as mastery of dialogue with the orchestra.

Holst also demonstrated his majesty by composing, between 1912 and 1918, the work that catapulted him to international fame. The seven planets that he drew (omitting the Earth) are accompanied by a subtitle that helps to understand the multiple inspirations that Holst sought but that do not go so far as to describe a specific programme, rather his impressions of the influence of astrology, the imagination of mythology, the mystery of destiny and the changing of the human spirit. Unlike Tchaikovsky, who looked at the musical past without giving up his present to compose the Rococo Variations, Holst clung to the musical influences of his present to open a window into the future.


REPERTOIRE

P. I. TXAIKOVSKI: Rococo Variations, op. 33
G. HOLST: The Planets, op. 32

PLAYERS

Gautier Capuçon, cello
Cor de Noies de l’Orfeó Català
Orquestra Simfònica Camera Musicae
Tomàs Grau, conductor

19 Dec

STAR WARS & OCM

Palau de la Música Catalana
Thursday, 19/12/2019 20:30

STAR WARS & OCM

AND OTHERS ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACKS BY JOHN WILLIAMS

Palau de la Música Catalana

Thursday, 19/12/2019 20:30

THE MUSIC THAT YOU SEE

Listening to the soundtracks of John Williams gives us the opportunity to see ourselves in front of the excitement of a big screen. His music is absolutely essential for understanding that when a composition is extraordinary it does not matter if its initial meaning was to accompany an image because it is capable of transcending that idea and embarking on a life of its own. This is a barrier that the composer Eric Wolfgang Korngold had already broken with his first soundtracks and which John Willliams has completely exploited.

His career has had a solid academic background and for seven decades he has composed works for film, television, theatre, world events and symphony halls that have received enormous recognition. Williams has not only won 5 Oscars, 4 golden globes and 23 Grammys, among many others, but has excited many different people. Creating music with so powerful a picture you are able to recall the same fear, the same smile, the same cry or the same sadness as when you first experienced it is not easy but Williams manages it like no other.


REPERTOIRE

J. WILLIAMS: Star Wars, E.T., Harry Potter, Jurassic Park, Schindler’s List

PLAYERS

Orquestra Simfònica Camera Musicae
Vladimir Kulenovic, conductor

21 Dec

STAR WARS & OCM

Palau de la Música Catalana
Saturday, 21/12/2019 12:00

STAR WARS & OCM

AND OTHERS ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACKS BY JOHN WILLIAMS

Palau de la Música Catalana

Saturday, 21/12/2019 12:00

THE MUSIC THAT YOU SEE

Listening to the soundtracks of John Williams gives us the opportunity to see ourselves in front of the excitement of a big screen. His music is absolutely essential for understanding that when a composition is extraordinary it does not matter if its initial meaning was to accompany an image because it is capable of transcending that idea and embarking on a life of its own. This is a barrier that the composer Eric Wolfgang Korngold had already broken with his first soundtracks and which John Willliams has completely exploited.

His career has had a solid academic background and for seven decades he has composed works for film, television, theatre, world events and symphony halls that have received enormous recognition. Williams has not only won 5 Oscars, 4 golden globes and 23 Grammys, among many others, but has excited many different people. Creating music with so powerful a picture you are able to recall the same fear, the same smile, the same cry or the same sadness as when you first experienced it is not easy but Williams manages it like no other.


REPERTOIRE

J. WILLIAMS: Star Wars, E.T., Harry Potter, Jurassic Park, Schindler’s List

PLAYERS

Orquestra Simfònica Camera Musicae
Vladimir Kulenovic, conductor

26 Jan 2020

BEETHOVEN’S PASTORAL SYMPHONY

Palau de la Música Catalana
Sunday, 26/01/2020 17:30

BEETHOVEN’S PASTORAL SYMPHONY

GÁBOR TAKÁCS-NAGY & OCM

Palau de la Música Catalana

Sunday, 26/01/2020 17:30

HUMAN AND NATURAL EXPERIENCES

During Christmas 1874, Tchaikovsky showed Nicolái Rubinstein the piano concerto he had written. He did not like the hard, cold reaction of his friend. But his criticisms did not fall on deaf ears and Tchaikovsky decided to rewrite passages and modify some melodies. Rubinstein did not premiere the play but he played it a lot and contributed to its projection. The novelties of this composition, in addition to the teaching of its author, are that the first movement has three themes, although it only develops the second and the third; the second movement is slow but it has a Scherzo in the centre, and the third is a Rondo that includes a diabolical passage of octaves for the pianist.

Beethoven was not only the bad-tempered, vehement and bitter artist who we usually think about, but he was also a positive and jokey person who enjoyed a walk in the country. His Symphony number 6 is influenced by a musical portrait of the nature of the composer Justin Heinrich Knecht and both tried to reflect the same: field; stream, birds; shepherds; storm; joy and gratitude, but in a different way. The titles of the movements seek to evoke rural memories and also show that nature gives us a space for celebrations and surprise us with a storm, like life itself.


REPERTOIRE

P. I. CHAIKOVSKI: Piano Concerto No. 1, op. 23
L. VAN BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 6, op. 68, “Pastoral”

PLAYERS

Daniel Kharitonov, piano
Orquestra Simfònica Camera Musicae
Gábor Takács-Nagyconductor

16 Feb 2020

MARK PADMORE & OCM

Palau de la Música Catalana
Sunday, 16/02/2020 17:30

MARK PADMORE & OCM

SHOSTAKOVICH THE FIFTH

Palau de la Música Catalana

Sunday, 16/02/2020 17:30

READ BETWEEN LINES

Britten chose six poems from very different eras and styles – spanning the 15th to the 19th centuries – to make up this work and he 6 had the help of the critic Edward Sackville-West to do so. The content of the texts that deal with the sunset, the feeling of peace, and peaceful death, goes hand-in-hand with a musical form, the serenade, which has its origin in a kind of calm, “serene” piece that was interpreted At dusk. Among the many contributions that Britten made to the musical composition, especially in his native country, here we find a great melodic imagination, as well as a lot of sharpness in the variety of timbre effects achieved with the horn.

Shostakovich also showed great ingenuity in getting his Fifth Symphony to the liking of the same regime that in his previous work had accused, denounced and censored. With this composition he responded to what was expected of a composer of socialist realism: to explain that contemporary life was a drama and that Stalin’s regime was salvation, as well as to write with clear musical structures and to finish triumphantly. But he did not renounce what he expected of himself: criticize the figure of the dictator and present a rich, imaginative and modern music.


REPERTOIRE

B. BRITTEN: Serenade for tenor, horn and orchestra, op. 31
D. SHOSTAKOVICH: Symphony No. 5, op. 47

PLAYERS

Mark Padmore, tenor
Pablo Hernández, horn
Orquestra Simfònica Camera Musicae
Tomàs Grau, conductor

22 Mar 2020

MOZART’S GREAT MASS IN C MINOR

Palau de la Música Catalana
Sunday, 22/03/2020 17:30

MOZART’S GREAT MASS IN C MINOR

SALVADOR MAS & OCM

Palau de la Música Catalana

Sunday, 22/03/2020 17:30

TWO INDISPUTABLE PILLARS

Bach and Mozart are the two major composers of the first and second half of the eighteenth century respectively. They had very different personalities and they moved in different musical styles, the baroque and the classic, but they shared their love for music and created extensive catalogues of works that allow us to enjoy their musical ideas in multiplicity of vocal and instrumental formations.

Orchestral Suite No. 1 is part of a set of four that were written during the so-called Leipizig period (1723-1750). It is formed by 6 dances preceded by an overture. In all of them, the star moments of strings and wind join together in a counterpoint texture of which Bach was a master without equal.

The influence of both Bach and Händel are found in Mozart’s Great Mass in C Minor. Written between 1782 and 1783 its name adopts the characteristics of the solemn or Neapolitan Mass, which, influenced byopera, separates the parts of the ordinary mass in different numbers and introduces virtuoso arias. Although Mozart did not finish the orchestration of some passages of the Creed and did not write an Agnus Dei, it is considered one of his most important sacred works.


REPERTOIRE

J. S. BACH: Orchestral Suite No. 1, BWV 1066
W. A. MOZART: Great Mass, in C minor, KV 427

PLAYERS

Cor Lieder Càmera
Orquestra Simfònica Camera Musicae
Salvador Mas, conductor

15 Apr 2020

ALEXEI VOLODIN & OCM

Palau de la Música Catalana
Wednesday, 15/04/2020 17:30

ALEXEI VOLODIN & OCM

BRAHM'S SECOND PIANO CONCERTO

Palau de la Música Catalana

Wednesday, 15/04/2020 17:30

COMPOSE AT YOUR OWN TEMPO

Brahms wrote two very different piano concertos: the first a work of his youth and the second a composition of a period of artistic maturity and personal stability that allowed him to write what he wanted at the pace he wanted. For this reason the structure is not the usual: it has two fast movements at the beginning instead of a fast and a slow one, and the fourth movement is not a Rondeau, although it does not abandon that triumphant chorus-stanza sensation.

Toldrà also wrote the Suite from which this Scherzo comes in a period in which his language was already defined as a neoclassicism of impressionist tints inspired by Catalan culture. It arose from the commission made by the writer Adrià Gual to compose the incidental music for his drama Lionor or the Filla del Marxant. The work never went on stage to accompany the word and was later released as an orchestral piece.

It took five years for Smetana to complete his cycle of six symphonic poems entitled My Homeland to which the Vltava belongs. The music describes from the source of this river from two springs to its confluence with the Elbe. In its course it shows us rural landscapes (forests, crops, a peasant wedding) as well as urban ones (castles, palaces, Prague).


REPERTOIRE

J. BRAHMS: Piano Concerto No. 2, op. 83
E. TOLDRÀ: Scherzo de Lionor o la Filla del marxant
B. SMETANA: Die Moldau

PLAYERS

Alexei Volodin, piano
Orquestra Simfònica Camera Musicae
Tomàs Grau, conductor

25 May 2020

PAUL LEWIS & OCM

Palau de la Música Catalana
Monday, 25/05/2020 20:00

PAUL LEWIS & OCM

BEETHOVEN'S COMPLETE PIANO CONCERTOS

Palau de la Música Catalana

Monday, 25/05/2020 20:00

LISTEN TO A RETROSPECTIVE

Observing the stylistic evolution of one of the greatest composers in the history of music is a great opportunity. Following in the footsteps of Mozart, who had opened the way to a new relationship between soloist and orchestra by distributing the virtuosity between them, Beethoven wrote his first concert at 17 years of age and the last at 41. In the course of his lifetime time he maintained some characteristics (they all have three movements, the first is fast in the form of Allegro de sonata, the second is slow and the third is fast in the form of Rondeau) but introduced important novelties that demonstrated his maturity as a composer and as a pianist.

Listening to the numbers 2, 3 and 4 in the first session, and 1 and 5 in the second session will allow us to keep track of the following elements as they progress chronologically: the increase in orchestral strength, the dynamic contrasts and the use of all the extension of the piano; number 3 is the only one in a minor mode and in which he refers expressly to Mozart using a theme of his 24th Concerto; number 4 is the first in which the piano, instead of the orchestra, introduces the themes of the first movement, and number 5, subtitled “Emperor” by its English publisher is, effectively, a concerto that is well above those of its contemporaries.


REPERTOIRE

L. VAN BEETHOVEN: Piano Concerto No. 2, B major, op. 19
L. VAN BEETHOVEN: Piano Concerto No. 3, C minor, op. 37
L. VAN BEETHOVEN: Piano Concerto No. 4, G major, op. 58

PLAYERS

Paul Lewis, piano
Orquestra Simfònica Camera Musicae
Tomàs Grau, conductor

26 May 2020

PAUL LEWIS & OCM

Palau de la Música Catalana
Tuesday, 26/05/2020 20:00

PAUL LEWIS & OCM

BEETHOVEN'S COMPLETE PIANO CONCERTOS

Palau de la Música Catalana

Tuesday, 26/05/2020 20:00

LISTEN TO A RETROSPECTIVE

Observing the stylistic evolution of one of the greatest composers in the history of music is a great opportunity. Following in the footsteps of Mozart, who had opened the way to a new relationship between soloist and orchestra by distributing the virtuosity between them, Beethoven wrote his first concert at 17 years of age and the last at 41. In the course of his lifetime time he maintained some characteristics (they all have three movements, the first is fast in the form of Allegro de sonata, the second is slow and the third is fast in the form of Rondeau) but introduced important novelties that demonstrated his maturity as a composer and as a pianist.

Listening to the numbers 2, 3 and 4 in the first session, and 1 and 5 in the second session will allow us to keep track of the following elements as they progress chronologically: the increase in orchestral strength, the dynamic contrasts and the use of all the extension of the piano; number 3 is the only one in a minor mode and in which he refers expressly to Mozart using a theme of his 24th Concerto; number 4 is the first in which the piano, instead of the orchestra, introduces the themes of the first movement, and number 5, subtitled “Emperor” by its English publisher is, effectively, a concerto that is well above those of its contemporaries.


REPERTOIRE

L. VAN BEETHOVEN: Piano Concerto No. 1, C major, op. 15
L. VAN BEETHOVEN: Piano Concerto No. 5, E major, op. 73, “Emperor”

PLAYERS

Paul Lewis, piano
Orquestra Simfònica Camera Musicae
Tomàs Grau, conductor

14 Jun 2020

EL CONCIERTO DE ARANJUEZ

Palau de la Música Catalana
Sunday, 14/06/2020 17:30

EL CONCIERTO DE ARANJUEZ

PABLO SÁINZ VILLEGAS & OCM

Palau de la Música Catalana

Sunday, 14/06/2020 17:30

GOOD DIGESTION

Rodrigo and Beethoven were very happy with the time they shared with their respective friends since both the concert and the symphony of this programme arose from conversations held in the heat of a good table. Eighty years have passed since the premiere in Paris (1939), the most famous and most interpreted guitar concerto of all time. An completely rounded piece, not only by the ingenuity of Joaquín Rodrigo to ensure that a symphony orchestra does not cover the sound of the guitar in any of its three movements, but also by the imaginative way in which it allows us to perceive some of the senses of the Gardens of Aranjuez : the sound of the birds, the murmur of the water from the fountains and even the perfume of the flowers.

Beethoven referred to this work as “a small symphony”, not because it lacked interest for him but because of its shorter duration. He always spoke of it with great love because it is an extrovert, happy and humorous work that helped him forget the sadness of the difficult relationships with his nephew and his sister-in-law. It does not have slow movement and in the Allegretto scherzando we can hear a good example of that good humor through a rhythmic obstinato that makes reference to the invention that Johann Nepomuk Mälzel was developing and that would come to be called a ‘metronome.


REPERTOIRE

J. RODRIGO: Concierto de Aranjuez
L. VAN BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 8, op. 93

PLAYERS

Pablo Sáinz Villegas, guitar
Orquestra Simfònica Camera Musicae
Carlos Miguel Prieto, conductor

ASSOCIACIÓ CAMERA MUSICAE
Moll de Lleida, Bloc 2, Oficina I 43004 Tarragona
Telephone: 877 020 051
E-mail: info@orquestracameramusicae.com

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